Mitt Romney’s failed definition of success

Mitt Romney, along with many Republicans, sees success as self-defining…

 

Mitt Romney with fellow colleagues at Bain Capital © JillK61

 

“I am being sunk by a society that demands success when all I can offer is failure,” says the ruined theater impresario Max Bialystock in Mel Brooks’s “The Producers.”

Mitt Romney sees things differently: He is offering success to a society that seems to actually prefer failure.

“If people think there’s something wrong with being successful in America, then they’d better vote for the other guy,” he says.

“Because I’ve been extraordinarily successful, and I want to use that success and that know-how to help the American people.”

Among the secrets of success that Romney might wish to share is how you arrange to be born to a rich family. Or, to be less vulgar, an intact and loving family that valued education. Or, for that matter, to be born smart. The neocon controversialist Charles Murray writes books arguing that the second and third factors (family and innate intelligence) are more important than the first (money).

You can argue about this all day, but in Romney’s case it doesn’t matter because he had all three factors hard at work, paving his way to success.

 

Read more at Bloomberg